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Composites of wood andtrans-1,4-isoprene rubber 1: Mechanical, physical, and flow behavior

Abstract

The modification oftrans-1,4-isoprene rubber (TIR) with maleic anhydride (MAH) was conducted in a kneader at 150°C, 30–70 rpm, for 10 min without using peroxide. The resultant MAH-modified TIR (MTIR) was then evaluated as a compatibilizer for TIR-wood flour (WF) composites. A control composite composed of TIR and WF only was also prepared. The presence of WF in the TIR-WF composite worsened the tensile and some physical properties. The addition of 5% MTIR as a compatibilizer to the whole composite improved the mechanical and the physical properties and increased the flow temperature and the melt viscosity. The improved composite had a 2.5 times increase in tensile strength and absorbed considerably less water than did the control composite. The SEM micrograph proved that interaction and adhesion between TIR and WF could be improved by the MTIR compatibilizer. The composites of TIR-MTIR-WF melts were of pseudoplastic nature, and their flows obeyed the Ostwald de Waele power law equation.

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Correspondence to Nobuo Shiraishi.

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Febrianto, F., Yoshioka, M., Nagai, Y. et al. Composites of wood andtrans-1,4-isoprene rubber 1: Mechanical, physical, and flow behavior. J Wood Sci 45, 38–45 (1999). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00579522

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Key words

  • Trans-1,4-isoprene rubber (TIR)
  • Maleic anhydride-modified TIR
  • Wood flour
  • Compatibilizer Composite