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Hydrogasification of wood for high heating-value gas production X: Effect of pretreatment of Japanese oak bark by HNO3 oxidation on subsequent iron-catalyzed hydrogasification

Abstract

Japanese oak bark, which is one of the most difficult woody biomass materials for iron-catalyzed lowtemperature (<700°C) hydrogasification, was subjected to HNO3 oxidation as the pretreatment after prewashing with water. The effect was compared with that of HCl demineralization from four points of view: (1) removal of catalyst poisons; (2) development of porosity in the cell tissue; (3) introduction of ion-exchanged iron; and (4) reduction of nitrogen and sulfur. It was found that HNO3-oxidized oak bark char loaded with iron by the ion-exchange method gave a satisfactory reactivity in agreement with the corresponding larch bark char previously used. Also, the oak bark char contained only small amounts of nitrogen and sulfur. These situations confirmed the high suitability of oxidation pretreatment combined with water prewashing for woody biomass.

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Correspondence to Tsutomu Suzuki.

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Suzuki, T., Deguchi, K., Kimura, Y. et al. Hydrogasification of wood for high heating-value gas production X: Effect of pretreatment of Japanese oak bark by HNO3 oxidation on subsequent iron-catalyzed hydrogasification. J Wood Sci 45, 76–83 (1999). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00579527

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Key words

  • Oak bark
  • Hydrogasification
  • HNO3 oxidation pretreatment
  • Iron catalyst