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Assessment of temperature and relative humidity conditioning performances of interior decoration materials in the Taipei area (II)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the conditioning effects of wood panels (used as interior decorating materials). We examined hourly the temperature and relative humidity (RH) in a living environment based on the average values during winters from 1974 to 1990 in the Taipei area. Thirty-six interior finish materials attached to one inside surface of a 35cm3 simulation aluminum container were used in this study. An A/V value (surface area of interior decoration materials attached to container/inside volume of container) of 2.86m−1 or various other A/V values and panel thicknesses had no significant effect on the room temperature changing ratio. The hygroscopic conditioning performances of these decorative materials were classified into four types in accordance withb values: type I (b>0.0200) included four solid woods (unfinished), two wood-based materials, three composite materials, and one inorganic material. Type II (0.0170<b<0.0199) included one solid wood, eight wood-based materials, and two inorganic materials. Type III (0.0070<b<0.0169) included 11 wood-based materials and four inorganic materials. The RH changing ratio decreased curvilinearly with increasing interior decorating panel thickness and A/V values in a sealed container, whereasb values increased with increasing interior decorating panel thickness and A/V values in a sealed container.

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Correspondence to Song-Yung Wang.

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Wang, S., Tsai, M. Assessment of temperature and relative humidity conditioning performances of interior decoration materials in the Taipei area (II). J Wood Sci 46, 470–476 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00765806

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Key words

  • Interior decorative materials
  • A/V values
  • Temperature changing ratio
  • Hygroscopic conditioning performance
  • Effectiveness of thickness