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Biological resistance of Zn-Al metal-coated wood

Abstract

Sapwood blocks of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) and akamatsu (Pinus densiflora) were coated with Zn/Al (45%/55%) alloy metal at thicknesses of 20–30, 90–100, and 180–200μm by an arc spray gun. They were served for choice and no-choice tests with a brown rot fungus (Fomitopsis palustris), a white rot fungus (Trametes versicolor), and a pest termite (Coptotermes formosanus). Coating thickness of 20–30μm was enough to prevent attacks by both test fungi, whereas 90–100μm thickness was needed for protection against termite attacks. Exfoliation of the coating layers was observed during the wet-dry process in the tests. The results suggested that Zn-Al alloy metal coating treatment was applicable as an alternative method for the protection of timbers from biological deterioration when combined with an additional treatment creating a vapor barrier.

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Correspondence to Tsuyoshi Yoshimura.

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Yoshimura, T., Takahashi, M. Biological resistance of Zn-Al metal-coated wood. J Wood Sci 46, 327–330 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00766225

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Key words

  • Metal-coated wood
  • Zn-Al alloy
  • Biological resistance
  • Decay fungi
  • Termite