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Official Journal of the Japan Wood Research Society

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Differences of tensile strength distributions between mechanically high-grade and low-grade Japanese larch lumber III: effect of knot restriction on the strength of lumber

Abstract

It is well known that the presence of knots in structural lumber is one of the most important strengthreducing factors. For practical purposes, visual grading including knot restriction is an effective method for nondestructive evaluation of strength. Edge knot restriction for not only visually graded lumbers but also mechanically graded lumbers is specified in the Japanese agricultural standards for glued laminated lumber. We conducted experimental studies on differences of tensile strength distributions between mechanically high-grade and low-grade Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi, carriere) lumbers daily used for manufacturing glued laminated timbers in Nagano, Japan. We then examined the additional visual grading of mechanically graded lumbers for nondestructive evaluation. We visually graded the prepared mechanically graded lumber by focusing on the knots' area ratio of grouped knots. We confirmed that the higher visual grade related to the stronger tensile strength, similar to our present knowledge; but the effects of knot restriction were reduced when the length of the lumber increased in view of nonparametric 5th percentiles of tensile strength. The differences in the strength/elasticity ratio between mechanically high-grade and low-grade lumber were negligible. It was clear that the length effect on the ratio in visually graded high-grade lumber was smaller than that of visually graded low-grade lumber. It was thus concluded that knot restriction should have little effect on the tensile strength of mechanically graded lumber.

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Correspondence to Takashi Taked.

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Taked, T., Hashizume, T. Differences of tensile strength distributions between mechanically high-grade and low-grade Japanese larch lumber III: effect of knot restriction on the strength of lumber. J Wood Sci 46, 95–101 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00777354

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Key words

  • Mechanical grading
  • Visual grading
  • Tension parallel to grain
  • Young's modulus