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Anisotropic thermal properties of molded carbon phenolic spheres

Abstract

Anisotropic thermal properties of molded carbon phenolic spheres (CPS), a mixture of sugi wood charcoal powders and phenol formaldehyde resin molded with a hot press, were investigated. The effects of the carbonizing temperature, particle size of chars, and density of the CPS on thermal properties were discussed. The molded CPS specimens were measured for their thermal properties using the laser flash method in both horizontal and vertical directions. The configuration of the CPS was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Anisotropy of the thermal properties (thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity) between horizontal and vertical directions of the molded CPS was much higher than that of the uncarbonized molded phenolic spheres. Therefore, converting wood into molded CPS is an effective way to enhance the thermal-anisotropy properties. More marked effects of the carbonizing temperature, particle size, and density were observed in the horizontal direction than in the vertical direction. Anisotropy in thermal properties of the molded CPS may be considered an advantage for developing a new fire-retardant material for wood composites.

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Correspondence to Toshimitsu Hata.

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Subyakto, Hata, T., Kawai, S. et al. Anisotropic thermal properties of molded carbon phenolic spheres. J Wood Sci 46, 16–21 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00779548

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Key words

  • Carbon
  • Wood charcoal
  • Phenol formaldehyde resin
  • Anisotropy
  • Thermal properties