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Official Journal of the Japan Wood Research Society

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Effect of environmental temperature on a small-scale biodegradation system for organic solid waste

Abstract

The optimum environmental temperature for a biodegrading machine using wood particles as a matrix was investigated using a small-scale degradation reactor and model waste. The biodegradation rate was evaluated by weight loss of waste and CO2 evolution. The degradation reaction was restricted only by adjusting the environmental temperature while sufficient oxygen and substrates were supplied. Results suggested that the optimum temperature for degradation was 30°–40°C for exploiting biological activity effectively with the lowest use of energy. Bacteria from the environment propagated in the reactor with no inoculum added. The microbial flora changed during the operation time but had no effect on the biodegradation rate.

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Correspondence to Sakae Horisawa.

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Horisawa, S., Sakuma, Y., Tamai, Y. et al. Effect of environmental temperature on a small-scale biodegradation system for organic solid waste. J Wood Sci 47, 154–158 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00780566

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Key words

  • Biodegradation
  • Food waste
  • Optimum temperature
  • Wood particles
  • Microorganism