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Official Journal of the Japan Wood Research Society

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Effects of impregnation of simple phenolic and natural polycyclic compounds on physical properties of wood

Abstract

The impregnation of various simple phenolic and natural polycyclic compounds into wood was investigated from the viewpoints of vibrational property and dimensional stabilizing effect. When simple phenolic compounds were impregnated, the loss tangent (tan δ) in the longitudinal direction increased linearly with increasing weight gain. Meanwhile, among the natural polycyclic compounds hematoxylin decreased the tan δ drastically by impregnation. It was suggested that the five hydroxyl groups and the pyran ring oxygen in the hematoxylin molecule contribute to formation of the crosslinkage-type hydrogen bonds between wood components. The rigidity of hematoxylin molecules may also be important. By impregnation of about 10% catechol, resorcinol, and saligenin, a 40% level of antiswelling efficiency (ASE) was attained, although a significant dimensional stabilizing effect was not observed after impregnation of natural polycyclic compounds.

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Sakai, K., Matsunaga, M., Minato, K. et al. Effects of impregnation of simple phenolic and natural polycyclic compounds on physical properties of wood. J Wood Sci 45, 227–232 (1999). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01177730

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Key words

  • Hematoxylin
  • Impregnation
  • Vibrational property
  • Dimensional stability
  • Extractive