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Official Journal of the Japan Wood Research Society

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Compressive deformation of wood impregnated with low molecular weight phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin V: effects of steam pretreatment

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Abstract

This study evaluated the potential of steam pre-treatment for making highly compressed phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin-impregnated wood at a low pressing pressure. Sawn veneers of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) were first subjected to saturated steam at different steaming temperatures (140°-200°C), followed by impregnation with a 20% low molecular weight PF resin aqueous solution resulting in a weight gain of around 50%-55%. Four oven-dried treated veneers were laminated and compressed up to a pressing pressure of 1 MPa at a pressing temperature of 150°C and pressing speed of 5 mm/min, and the pressure was held for 30 min. Steam treatment, causing partial hydrolysis of hemicellulose, accelerated the compressibility of Japanese cedar in the PF resin-swollen condition. As a consequence, a discernible increment in density was achieved at a pressing pressure of 1 MPa due to steam pretreatment between 140° and 200°C for 10 min. It was also found that even a short steaming time such as 2 min at 160°C is sufficient for obtaining appreciable compression of PF resin-impregnated wood. The density, Young’s modulus, and bending strength of steam-treated (200°C for 10 min) PF resin-impregnated wood composite reached 1.09 g/cm3, 20 GPa, and 207MPa, respectively. In contrast, the values of untreated PF resin-impregnated wood composite were 0.87 g/cm3, 13 GPa, and 170MPa, respectively.

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Correspondence to Hiroyuki Yano.

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Shams, M.I., Morooka, T. & Yano, H. Compressive deformation of wood impregnated with low molecular weight phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin V: effects of steam pretreatment. J Wood Sci 52, 389–394 (2006) doi:10.1007/s10086-005-0787-7

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Key words

  • Compressed wood
  • Steam treatment
  • PF resin impregnation
  • Compressive deformation
  • Mechanical properties