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Official Journal of the Japan Wood Research Society

Manufacture of oriented board using mild steam treatment of plant fiber bundles

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of mild steam treatment (0.1 MPa for 2 h) of natural bio-based fibers and orientation (0° and 90°) of those fibers in various fiberboards. Ramie bast, pineapple leaf, and sansevieria fiber bundles were used as materials. The composite fiberboards were prepared using phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin. To investigate the effect of mild steam treatment on wettability, contact angles of PF resin to the fiber were measured. The mechanical properties of the boards were examined as well as their dimensional stability. The contact angle data showed that mild steam treatment was effective in improving the wettability of fibers. Unioriented steam-treated boards showed better performance of internal bond (IB), moduli of rupture (MOR) and elasticity (MOE), thickness swelling (TS), and water absorption (WA) than other boards. Unioriented steam-treated sansevieria board with longitudinal fiber direction showed higher average values of MOR (403 MPa), MOE (39.2 GPa), and IB (1.33 MPa) and lower values of TS (5.15%) and WA (8.68%) than other boards. The differences in the mechanical properties and dimensional stability of boards were found mainly due to the differences in the ratios of fiber fraction of the boards to the density of the fiber bundles.

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Correspondence to Sasa Sofyan Munawar.

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Munawar, S.S., Umemura, K. & Kawai, S. Manufacture of oriented board using mild steam treatment of plant fiber bundles. J Wood Sci 54, 369–376 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10086-008-0968-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10086-008-0968-2

Key words

  • Plant fiber
  • Steam treatments
  • Oriented fiberboard
  • Mechanical properties
  • Dimension stability