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Effect of pressure on organic acid production from Japanese beech treated in supercritical water

Abstract

The effect of pressure as described by density was studied on organic acid production from Japanese beech (Fagus crenata) treated in supercritical water. At a reaction temperature of 380°C, the maximum yield of organic acids was 35% at a pressure of 30 MPa (density of water: 0.53 g/ml) for 1 min in a batch-type system. Furthermore, the yield of organic acids decreased with increasing reaction pressure. It was also found that fragmented products from sugars such as methylglyoxal and glycolaldehyde could be more easily converted to organic acids than dehydrated products such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural. This result suggests that organic acids can be mainly derived from fragmented products.

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Correspondence to Shiro Saka.

Additional information

Part of this article was presented at the 55th Annual Meeting of the Japan Wood Research Society (2005), and at the 17th Annual Meeting of Japan Institute of Energy (2007)

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Yoshida, K., Miyafuji, H. & Saka, S. Effect of pressure on organic acid production from Japanese beech treated in supercritical water. J Wood Sci 55, 203–208 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10086-008-1015-z

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Key words

  • Japanese beech
  • Supercritical water
  • Pressure
  • Organic acid
  • Reaction pathway