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Official Journal of the Japan Wood Research Society

Application of activable tracers to investigate radial movement of minerals in the stem of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica)

Abstract

Two activable tracers, Rb and Eu, were injected into the sapwood of Japanese cedars (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) to investigate the radial movement of minerals in their stems in the resting period. Eight trees of four cultivars, two of which genetically form wet heartwood, were treated near the end of the growing period. At 40 days after the treatment, Rb was detected in the outer heartwood, whereas Eu was not. Radial movement of Rb was more rapid in trees with wet heartwood than in those with normal heartwood. At 204 days after the treatment, more Rb was detected in the heartwood than was found on the first sampling, whereas no Eu was detected in the heartwood. The difference in radial movement between Rb and Eu was considered mainly to be the result of selective transport of beneficial minerals by Japanese cedar. The difference in the rate of radial movement of Rb between wet and normal heartwood became more conspicuous at 204 days after treatment. We concluded that the movement of Rb from the sapwood to the outer heartwood was by active transport through the rays, whereas that in the heartwood was by diffusion due to the gradient of Rb concentration.

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Correspondence to Naoki Okada.

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Okada, N., Hirakawa, Y. & Katayama, Y. Application of activable tracers to investigate radial movement of minerals in the stem of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica). J Wood Sci 57, 421–428 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10086-011-1188-8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10086-011-1188-8

Key words

  • Rb
  • Eu
  • Neutron activation analysis
  • Radial transport
  • Heartwood formation