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Official Journal of the Japan Wood Research Society

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Bending strength and toughness of heat-treated wood

Abstract

The load-deflection curve for static bending and the force-time curve for impact bending of heat-treated wood were examined in detail. The effect of oxygen in air was also investigated. Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis Carr.) was heated for 0.5–16.0h at a temperature of 160°C in nitrogen gas or air. The dynamic Young's modulus was measured by the free-free flexural vibration test, the static Young's modulus and work needed for rupture by the static bending test, and the absorbed energy in impact bending by the impact bending test. The results obtained were as follows: (1) The static Young's modulus increased at the initial stage of the heat treatment and decreased later. It decreased more in air than in nitrogen. (2) The bending strength increased at the initial stage of the heat treatment and decreased later. It decreased more in air than in nitrogen. (3) The work needed for rupture decreased steadily as the heating time increased. It decreased more in nitrogen than in air. It is thought that heat-treated wood was more brittle than untreated wood in the static bending test because W12 was reduced by the heat treatment. This means that the main factors contributing to the reduction of the work needed for rupture were viscosity and plasticity, not elasticity. (4) The absorbed energy in impact bending increased at the initial stage of the heat treatment and decreased later. It decreased more in air than in nitrogen. It was concluded that heat-treated wood became more brittle in the impact bending test becauseI 12 andI 23 were reduced by the heat treatment.

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Correspondence to Yoshitaka Kubojima.

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Kubojima, Y., Okano, T. & Ohta, M. Bending strength and toughness of heat-treated wood. J Wood Sci 46, 8–15 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00779547

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Key words

  • Heat treatment
  • Impact bending
  • Toughness
  • Bending strength
  • Equilibrium moisture content